]> Eight herbs - RÖSLE

Eight herbs

 

 

 

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1. Basil

 

With basil, also known as the king's herb, both fresh and dry leaves add a special note to many dishes. Basil has a very delicate taste which goes especially well with fresh tomatoes, and offers an incomparable Mediterranean food experience as part of this combination. The scent of basil is particularly fresh, mild, slightly sweet and a little piquant.

 

Special qualities:

Basil is used in herbal medicine for loss of appetite and bloating, and also has anti-bacterial and calming effects.

 

Tip:

It's worth noting that basil leaves lose important aromas when dried. This is why fresh basil is considered the better choice in the kitchen.

 


 

 

2. Parsley

 

Parsley, a well-known herb often used as a garnish, can be used raw or briefly heated. In Germany, it is also known as 'Peterle', a short form of its German name, 'Petersilie'. It is used to refine and/or decorate many different dishes - soups, salads, herbed curd, or even as parsley pesto. Parsley has a strongly aromatic and fresh, tangy taste. Flat parsley has a much stronger taste than the curly variety.

 

Special qualities:

Parsley is packed with vitamins, and rich in important minerals. Because of its very high vitamin C content, it has an invigorating effect and helps prevent fatigue.

 

Tip:

Only heat parsley leaves briefly, otherwise they'll lose their typical aroma. Parsley also keeps very well in the fridge.

 


 

3. Thyme

 

Thyme has a particularly tangy taste that perfectly complements olives, courgettes, tomatoes and aubergines. It has a very hearty taste and an aromatic odour. With its bittersweet and wonderfully piquant after-taste, it's a magic ingredient for many meals; with chicken, on fish, with fruit or even ice cream.

 

Special qualities:

Thyme's healing strength is good for colds, e.g. when used for tea. It's said to have a particularly calming effect on people with coughs.

 

Tip:

As a rule of thumb, dried thyme is three times stronger than fresh thyme.

 


 

4. Rosemary

 

 

In the kitchen, rosemary goes particularly well with poultry, lamb or potatoes. It is a main ingredient of 'herbes de Provence', a French herb mixture. Its scent conjures up images of a Mediterranean climate. The aroma of rosemary has been described as heartily piquant, similar to the scent of incense, and tartly bitter.


Special qualities:

Rosemary has anti-bacterial and relaxing qualities. It's also good for healthy blood pressure, as consuming rosemary enables you to keep fit and stay strong and healthy.

 

Tip:

In contrast to parsley, rosemary is used sparingly in cooking and cooked during preparation in order to bring out its taste.

 


 

5. Chives

 

What would fresh cuisine be without chives? These fine stalks are related to onions and are one of the most popular herbs, along with parsley. This popularity stems from its many uses; fresh chives add flavour to salads, soups and egg dishes. Chives have a fresh, tangy taste and, regarding their intensity, they're somewhere between leeks and onions.

 

Special qualities:

Chives are very rich in vitamin C. They're also good for stimulating the appetite, calming the stomach and cleansing the blood.

 

Tip:

When cutting chives with scissors, cut them very small and finely in curls, as it makes their taste and aroma much stronger. It's usually better to use raw chives.

 


 

6. Coriander

 

Both individual parts of the coriander plant, which hails from the Mediterranean, can be used for certain purposes. Firstly, there are its seeds, which have a particularly aromatic scent. Then there are its leaves, which an exotic and fresh tang to a multitude of dishes. Coriander has a tangy, piquant and slightly sweet taste.

 

Special qualities:

Amongst other things, coriander can be used as an appetite stimulant or a digestion aid.

 

Tip:

Dried coriander has a noticeably milder taste than fresh. Coriander should be used sparingly.

 


 

7. Mint

 

It's said of mint that its smell alone has an immediate appetising and bewitching effect. In cooking, it gives several meals a pure, unmistakeable note. This note has inspired creative recipes for both sweet desserts and savoury ideas. Mint releases a strongly aromatic, cool, fresh taste.

 

Special qualities:

It has a cooling, revitalising effect. It is a timeless classic for fighting colds, but also helps with headaches.

 

Tip:

Mint is particularly delicious with fresh vanilla ice cream and gives this dessert a really different and unique tang.

 


 

8. Chervil

 

Chervil, with its gently peppery aroma, brings a much needed freshness and piquancy to all kinds of meals, such as various broths or egg dishes. Moreover, the delicate, ethereal aroma of this herb adds a certain 'je ne sais quoi' to meals, especially to soups and salads. Chervil has a distinct gently sweet taste, similar to aniseed.

 

Special qualities:

This fresh kitchen herb is packed with vitamins and good for circulation.

 

Tip:

Use fresh chervil whenever possible, as dried or frozen chervil is less strong and a less intensive aroma. Chervil should not be cooked but added at the end of the cooking period.

 



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